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Spotlight   |  Spring 2005

Two degrees - one program

 

Image: Mike Boehlje

While the majority of coursework in the Purdue-IU MS-MBA program is completed via distance-education, students and faculty come together as a group during five one-week residencies. Professor Mike Boehlje was among the Purdue Agriculture faculty teaching during the first residency last August in Indianapolis . (Photo by Vince Walter)

As joint venture between Purdue Agriculture and the Indiana University Kelley School of Business is providing an industry-specific graduate program for food and agribusiness management professionals around the world.

The program combines Purdue's long-standing strength in food and agribusiness management with IU's expertise in distance-delivered education. On completion, students will have earned two advanced degrees: a master of science in agribusiness from Purdue and a master of business administration from IU.

“The dual-degree program delivers the best of both worlds—an industry-specific focus on current issues in food and agriculture and a general MBA,” says Jay Akridge, professor of agribusiness and program director.

Distance-learning degree programs like this one are attractive to mid-career professionals because it gives them control over where and when they study. “These are people who often travel on business, have young families and are frequently transferred within their organizations. Taking a year off for a full-time program or enrolling in a part-time evening or weekend program doesn't work for them,” Akridge says.

“You have to work hard, but the program has the flexibility to let you set your own schedule,” says Ben Poletti, territory manager for Deere & Co., who is a member of the first class, which started last fall. “If you're traveling, you can take it on the plane with you.”

Students are currently being enrolled to begin their degree program in August, the annual start date for the 27-month program.

 

© 2005 Purdue University College of Agriculture

 

 

 

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